Lipman's, Portland, Oregon







Lipman, Wolfe & Co. (Lipman’s)
521 S.W. Fifth
Portland, Oregon 97204 (1857)




DOWNTOWN STORE DIRECTORY (220,000 sq.ft.)


Lower Level
Lipman’s Men’s Cellar Men’s Sportswear • Men’s Shoes • Men’s Hats • The Thread Baron • Smoke Shop • Boy’s Cellar • Sporting Goods • Ski Shop • Gourmet Shop • Men’s Grill

First Floor
Fine Jewelry • Jewelry • Cosmetics • Handbags • Gloves • Small Leather Goods • Hosiery • Fashion Accessories • Scarves • Cascade Sportswear • First Floor Lingerie • Stationery • Candy • Camera Shop • Notions • Men’s Furnishings • Accommodation Center

Mezzanine
Books • Chocolate Lounge Restaurant

Second Floor
Caliente Sportswear • Caliente Dresses • Waverly Dresses • Waverly Sportswear • Miss Waverly Shop • Cascade Dresses • Cascade Sportswear • Cascade Coats • The Better Half • Casual Shoes

Third Floor
Shoe Salon • Fur Salon • Bridal Salon • Millinery • Coat Salon • Suit Salon • Contemporaries • Talk of the Town Shop • Signature Shop • Designer’s Showcase • The Gown Salon • Innerwear • Intimate Apparel

Fourth Floor
Maternity Shop • Uniforms • Daytime Dresses • Very Young Shops • Girls’ Shop • Subteen Shop • Toyland

Fifth Floor
Fashion Fabrics • Sewing Notions • Art Needle • Bedding & Linen Shop • Draperies • Curtains • Drapery Fabrics • Photo Studio

Sixth Floor
Housewares • Appliances • China • Silverware • Gifts • Lamps • Clocks • Pictures, Mirrors • Radio and TV • Pianos • Appliances

Seventh Floor
Furniture • Floor Coverings • Rugs • Sleep Shop

Eighth Floor
Junior Shops • Junior Whirl • Beauty Salon • Canned Ego

Ninth Floor
Tea Room • Personnel Office • Cashier’s Desk



BRANCH STORES

Salem (1956)
285 Liberty
75,000 sq.ft.
The Cherry Room

















Corvallis (1959)
215 S. 4th. St.
45,000 sq.ft.

Eastport Plaza (1960)
90,000 sq.ft.
The Tea Room








Washington Square (1973)
Tigard
113,000 sq.ft.

Lloyd Center (1974)
50,000 sq.ft.

Valley River Mall (1975)
Eugene

50,000 sq.ft.



17 comments:

  1. Question: Did the Corvallis Lipman's store have an escalator in the center?

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  2. No escalator, but it had an elevator, which was really cool for us kids growing up in Corvallis.

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  3. Does anyone have "The Chocolate Lounge" menu? They had an incredible parfait with ?malt that has since disappeared from the food chain. Any idea of where to find the menu?

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  4. Does anyone recall if they sold furs in the Salem & Corvallis stores, and did the company continue to sell furs under the "Lipman-Wolfe" brand until it was later abandoned after the chain was sold? Anyone remember what floor they were on in Salem & Corvallis? THANKS for the memories!

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  5. What? Are there no more entries for 2013? Does anyone know whether the Lipman's store chains recorded any information regarding the artists whose artwork the store might have framed?
    Hello? Anyone? Anyone?
    I currently own an oil painting which was framed at a Lipman's Department Store, but I have no way of knowing which store. Also, I can't fully make out the artists name at the corner of the painting.

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    Replies
    1. I also have framed art and need help.

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  6. In Salem at Christmas Lipman's had a Cinnamon Bear who would walk around and give out gingerbread cookies to children. My Mother would take my brother and I to see the Cinnamon Bear every Christmas in the 1960's.

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  7. I worked in the Tearoom in the late sixties. I would love to find a menu from 1968-1970!

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  8. I am looking for an old friend who worked at Lipman's, as a salesman and buyer, in the 70's. His name was Steve Parker. Any info would be appreciated. BruceG543@yahoo.com

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  9. My Mom worked in housewares at the downtown Portland location. I still have the salt and pepper shakers she started my collection from there. I used to love to see the unusual items she brought home. It was around '72-74

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  10. What a very cool website! When we are young we assume the world we entered is a given without much thought about where it came from. We may even assume that today will always exist unchanged. Only later do we understand that everything is temporary and will be replaced by the sands of time.

    I'm wondering about the Cinnamon Bear. My recollection is that he was part of the Lipman store Christmas Holiday festivities. However, it could have been Meier and Frank. I've always associated Lipmans with the Cinnamon Bear and Meier and Franks with Santa Clause in the 1960's.

    I appreciate the personal memories left on this website. Together, they are pieces of a beautiful picture of yesterday.

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  11. Thanks for the insight. You have tapped into my reason for creating the Museum.
    -Bruce

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  12. I am remembering buying a watchband at the watchmaker's, which was almost buried under the escalator on the first floor. And when my aunt Lucille took me to lunch on the mezzanine. This was in the early '70s.

    Later my sister and i hung out on the 4th floor in the toy section, and made friends with the clerks. One lady (whose name I have long since forgotten) taught me to make bows out of ribbon, and let me help with Christmas gift wrapping. Needless to say, I've munched many a Cinnamon Bear cookie.

    I miss Lipman & Wolfe. Of course, I also miss Newbury's lunch counter and remainders bin (got some of my favorite books out of there).

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  13. A long shot, but did anyone ever work with a carpenter at Lipman's (Portland) called George McHardy Stewart? You would have been quite young and he was near retirement age, just wondering. He was my great-uncle but I never knew him.

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  14. Thank you for your website devoted to Lipman-Wolfe. I worked at the Eastport Plaza store from 1967-1971. I first started in Caliente Sportswear, sometimes covering at the Candy Counter, then went upstairs to the Housewares and worked for a manager named 'Vera'. She gave me the 'Christmas Candle and Decor' department to run for 2 seasons. I finished my tenure as a cashier at the 'payment window'(I worked with a lovely, red-haired lady named Nadine) and switchboard operator in Customer Service. I recall when I started working, I was making 90 cents-an-hour, and when I left, I was making $1.15/hr. I was so excited to make over a dollar-an-hour! Great memories.

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  15. My great-grandmother worked at Lipman Wolfe until she married in 1907. I have lots of memorabilia of hers from LW, including postcards between employees, account cards, notes, letters, etc. After years of moving trunks around the country with me, the time has come to let it go. Would you like scans of anything first?

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    Replies
    1. Please contact Bruce - bakgraphics@comcast.net

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